Writing Motherhood

Whether she was Mrs. March or Medea, everybody had a mom, and no matter what her strengths or foibles were, she had a huge part in shaping who you are. The relationship between mother and child is one of the most challenging to dissect that there is, but some writers manage to do just that. For this mother’s day, we’ve put together a list of some great books by mothers and about mothers that explore the challenges of being–and loving–a mom.
   

 

 Dunk Mom Drunk Mom
Jowita Bydlowska
Bydlowska’s harrowing description of the tug of war between maternal love and alcohol addiction she experiences after giving birth to her first child is both a grim page-turner and a lesson in frank self-examination.
 White Oleander White Oleander
Janet Fitch
Fitch’s Ingrid, a brilliant but dangerously unstable poet imprisoned for murdering her lover, looms large in the mind of her daughter, Astrid, as she struggles through a girlhood in the foster system, and in the memory of anyone who’s read this book.
 Knocked Up Knocked Up: Confessions of a Hip Mother-to-be
Rebecca Eckler
Eckler pulls off a candid but unflaggingly stylish account of her unplanned pregnancy, and the glamorous career and high-living lifestyle where new motherhood finds an unlikely place.
 Love You Forever Love You Forever  
Robert Munch
Robert Munch’s masterpiece illustrates the lifelong relationship of a mother and son with the deceptive simplicity and emotional power of a favourite lullaby.
 Still Point The Still Point of the Turning World
Emily Rapp
This deeply touching and insightful memoir of raising a terminally ill child raises questions about  what being a good mother and living a meaningful life is.
Light Oceans The Light Between Oceans
M. L. Stedman
Not for the faint of heart, Stedman’s heartbreaking novel pits a mother’s love for her child against her sense of right and wrong to fantastic result.
Mom & Me & Mom Mom & Me & Mom
Maya Angelou
One of the greatest memoirists alive tells the story of her and her mother’s complex, imperfect, but deeply loving relationship.

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