One Fictitious Moment: Writing Historical Fiction

As a huge fan of historical fiction, Angela Misri thoroughly enjoys writing about her detective Portia Adams as she strolls the streets of 1930s London. But there are some tricks to writing in a time period that are not your own. Check out this video for a few timely ideas: Watch for more writing videos on this blog, or you can subscribe to Angela's Youtube channel One Fictitious Moment. Angela Misri is a Toronto journalist, writer and mom who has spent most of her working life making CBC Radio extraterrestrial through podcasts, live streams and websites. The latest book in her A Portia Adams Adventure series releases on March 24th, 2015. Check out Angela's website to learn more about the Portia Adams series. … [Read more...]

Interested in Taking your Writing to the Next Level?

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  Then why not let a host of industry experts guide you on your writing journey to help you shape your writing, sell more books and even reach a new international audience. IPR License, in association with The Writing Bank, has announced a new six-part course for writers. The course comprises of six modules hosted by some of the leading voices in the publishing world. For full details on each session, please click here. In addition, there will be a final one-on-one event with industry professionals to receive advice on your work and plans followed by networking and celebratory drinks for completing the course. Due to demand, IPR and The Writing Bank have opened up individual session bookings alongside the full six session course. An Early Bird 25% discount offer is available … [Read more...]

Can This Be Over Already?: Confronting the Truth about Endings

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By Shayna Krishnasamy You’ve done it. You’re embarking on the final chapter of your book. You’ve reached the denouement. You type out the word “Epilogue” with shaking fingers. You can’t really believe it. You’ve reached the end. This is the end. Terrifying, isn’t it? Well, terrifying might be a strong word, but many authors have mixed emotions when they come to the end of their book. Maybe the novel isn’t what they hoped it would be. Or maybe they don’t have their next writing project lined up, and the idea of all that free time is alarming. Maybe they enjoyed writing the book so much they’re sad to see it go. Or maybe they’re relieved to finally be done with a book they lost interest in writing a month ago. Whatever the author’s feelings about the ending of her book might … [Read more...]

Subway Scribbles

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By Lydia Laceby “You have to make the time.” It’s something you hear writers utter when asked how they find the time to write a novel. Whether it’s at midnight with a glass of wine when the kids are in bed, or in the wee hours of the morning before they’re up demanding breakfast; whether you take one evening a week away from your spouse or one morning on a weekend and ignore the housework. You have to make the time. Your novel will never get written otherwise. And in my experience, I have found this to be true. You can always find thousands of reasons not to write, particularly in this age of social media. But you have to sacrifice something. Sleep, cleaning, sex, cooking, exercising, spending time with your mother — something has to give. For me, that sacrifice is in the … [Read more...]

KWL Blog from 2014 In Review

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The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for this blog. The Louvre Museum has 8.5 million visitors per year. This blog was viewed about 150,000 times in 2014. If it were an exhibit at the Louvre Museum, it would take about 6 days for that many people to see it. The top blog posts in 2014 were: 10 Winning Ways to Open Your Novel (Craft of Writing) This article, by Darcy Pattison, outlines tips from her book Start Your Novel and lists a number of ways to start novels, giving examples from the top 100 opening lines of all times. Twisting the Plot for a Great Mystery (Craft of Writing) Connie Shelton's article covers the elements of what makes a good mystery with a focus on great plot twists. Six Tips for Engaging Readers within two seconds: … [Read more...]

Is Your Funny Flabby? Better Hit the Comedy Gym

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By Jefferson Smith Humor is one of the most powerful implements in the writer's tool kit. A quick wit can be a spark of light to balance dark times; shared laughter can unite uncertain allies against insurmountable oppressions; the quality and content of a joke, and the reactions to it, can illuminate the character and intellect of every hero, villain, or bystander who hears it. Yet authors rarely wield this weapon with any facility, and even fewer attempt a conscious study of it, which is a shame. Because even if you write more like Tennessee Williams than Robin Williams, you can beef up your funny muscle. All you need to do is find the right gym. I found my gym entirely by accident. Like most writers, I started young, developing my chops on short stories in high school and then … [Read more...]

The Hit List: Mark 4

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By Joshua Essoe When November (National Novel Writing Month) is over, a writer's "first draft done" mind often turns to editing. The is the 4th in a series of 4 articles focusing on editing by a full-time freelance editor, continuing advice, insight and that editorial perspective. (Read the first article. Read the 2nd article. Read the 3rd article) "Joshua Essoe, I'm not a newbie. I know how to spell and I know how to tell a good story. Is an editor really necessary?" My answer is always the same. No, Mr. McWriterpants--an editor is not necessary, an editor is essential. No matter how full of amazeballs you are, even if you have known every point on these hit lists, it is impossible for one to see their work objectively, to spot every time there is a clash between what one … [Read more...]

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